Throughout not just the region, but the state, Raffin represented Wyalusing, and he was a person that represented the town, the school, and the football team the right way.

Karl Raffin has seen how much his dad meant to not only the football team, but all of Wyalusing.

"I think that"s the thing, he"s most known in circles as a football coach," Karl Raffin said. "But, he was ingrained in the community. He was an active member of a lot of civic organizations. He was just really respected. He was a straight shooter, a fair guy. He was just highly respected. I think a lot of small communities have that kind of guy, and he was that kind of guy here."

In high school Karl Raffin played for his dad.

As he got older Karl went into coaching himself, and that"s when it really hit him about how good of a coach his father was.

"I"m not sure I understood it at the time," Karl Raffin said of playing for his dad. "Once I got myself into coaching and saw what it was all about, he was a tremendous coach. He put in the time. He was passionate about it. He was always trying to better himself as a coach, always trying to learn. He was a fair coach. He was firm, disciplined and he was knowledgeable and he knew what he was doing and he let his other coaches coach. He was a very good coach."

Earlier this fall Wyalusing honored Raffin by naming the Wyalusing football field after him.

It was a great honor; however, to hear his former players and assistant coaches talk about him, you would quickly realize that no honor could do justice for what Raffin meant to the school.

Longtime Wyalusing assistant coach Dave Behrend was fighting back tears as he talked about coaching with his friend.

Former players talked about how much Raffin changed their entire lives.

Karl Raffin was happy that his father got to be a part of that moment.

"It was really great," Karl said. "I"m really happy the school did that. My mother was Doctor (Karl) Peterson"s personal nurse for 30 years. I am named after Karl Peterson. It"s Peterson Stadium. It"s Ray Raffin field. It all kind of fits together. To get that kind of recognition was really nice and I think my dad really appreciated it. He wasn"t one for accolades, but I think it was special for him."

Even today, Raffin is a coach that everyone in the NTL respects, and they all know what he meant to the league.

"I speak all the time to our district coaches association and I know the things they set up years ago between my father, and coach Moyer and coach Raffin," Athens coach Jack Young said. "They were the foundation of what NTL football kind of became. Coach Raffin was one of those three guys and he was nothing but a class act. Everything he did was a class act. Stories I heard of his relationship with his own players. I know for a fact he"s reached out to check out on players from other teams.

"When I came back and became the head football coach at Athens, he was one of the first people to reach out to me. He"s just a class act, probably the biggest thing I could say about Ray Raffin."

Karl Raffin knows that it was a special time for NTL football when his dad was coaching.

"Canton was a perennial district contender," Karl said. "In that time frame we had undefeated seasons in there and a district championship. Towanda was always tough. The guy from Troy was highly respected, (Mark) Strzelecki was highly respected. It was the Golden era of NTL football."

As the son of one of those three legendary coaches, Jack Young knows how much the three of them meant to the region.

"I just know those three guys, and coach Raffin and my father especially, were so active in the state association," Young said. My father and coach Raffin are both past presidents of the state association. They worked hard to recognize all areas of the state. Worked so hard on doing things, whether it be for a young man"s play on the field or his academics.

"I can"t tell you how many stories I have heard from people that didn"t play football and what he meant to them as a teacher and a mentor. The same type of things I heard about coach Moyer and my father. It brings me back to a lot of old times. The kind of things I think about when football season ends, I as a coach think about how I need to improve. It automatically brings me back to think about guys like my dad and coach Raffin. They were competitive as hell on that Friday night in October or first Friday in November, but other than that they were tremendous friends. Wyalusing was always tough as hell, they were always well coached. He touched so many people that weren"t even football players. When you talk to the people in my generation they were our coaches. Whether I"m in the Canton/Troy area, Wyalusing. The ball is kind of in our court, for us to keep things thriving we have to rely on what they built."

What the NTL is today started with guys like Raffin.

" They were the foundation of what the NTL is all about right now," Young said. "Those are the guys that put NTL football on the map. They did everything in their power to prove the NTL could compete. Everything those guys did was just legendary. What is unique there legendary status as NTL coaches, but if you look at those guys and what they did previously growing up, being athletes in high school, going to the military, no matter what they did. Those guys just did legendary stuff. Losing someone like coach Raffin is really hard. I guess now it really is kind of a time to reflect.

"They took what NTL football was to another level. The way those guys prepared for games. They didn"t have the technology they have today. The way Ray Raffin, Miller Moyer and my father prepared it was tremendous. I learned it from my father, but I also learned it from those guys. You have to outwork the next guys. They all had tremendous, unbelievable, historic runs, where they won three NTL titles, umpteen NTL titles in a row. It doesn"t happen. I may spend my entire coaching career driving for that undefeated season, but those are the guys that set the tone with how hard they work. I know for a fact those three guys are responsible for how we get together as NTL coaches now and discuss how we approach the offseason stuff. They built traditions, they built a camaraderie between our NTL coaches. It"s because of them that we have a great camaraderie, great friendship among our coaches."

Karl Raffin always saw what kind of work ethic his dad put in as coach.

"Honest to God, some of my fondest memories were the coaches being around here all weekend long," Raffin said. "Watching game films, or driving around the area watching games, driving to Canton on Saturday"s. He put in the time. He made sure he was prepared. Him and Jack Young were incredibly close. They went to clinics together. I have a lot of fond memories of Jack and my dad."

Like Young, Karl Raffin always saw how hard the coaches competed on Friday"s, and then how well they got along off the field.

"To put it in perspective, when Jack Young died, my dad was one of his pallbearers," Karl Raffin said. "They were rivals on the field, but they were good friends. My father and Jack Young were ambassadors for high school football. They were involved in things like the Big 33. That was my family vacation when I was a kid, we went to Hershey for the Big 33."

For all he accomplished in his coaching career, Raffin was never one to brag or make a big deal out of it.

When the field was named after him, Raffin put in simple terms what he had accomplished.

"We had a good time with what we did," Raffin said on that day. "It was a career."

It was a career at Wyalusing for Raffin. It was a career that no one will ever forget.

Like Moyer at Canton and Young at Towanda, there will never be anyone who forgets the legacy of Raffin in Wyalusing.

It"s a legacy that helped put Wyalusing on the map.

"It"s similar to a Bill Sexton (at Towanda), you got just about any place and you say you are from Wyalusing and they know my father, or they know the wrestling program," Karl Raffin said. "He did get a lot of recognition for the area, for sure."

Generations from now people will see the words Ray Raffin Field, and they will remember all he accomplished during that career.

And, today, many miss Raffin and what he meant to so many.

"Coach Raffin is going to be missed," Young said. "We are going to have those times to reflect and enjoy all the memories. There are definitely three legendary coaches up there right now and I definitely think they are together right now catching up."

Throughout not just the region, but the state, Raffin represented Wyalusing, and he was a person that represented the town, the school, and the football team the right way.

Karl Raffin has seen how much his dad meant to not only the football team, but all of Wyalusing.

"I think that"s the thing, he"s most known in circles as a football coach," Karl Raffin said. "But, he was ingrained in the community. He was an active member of a lot of civic organizations. He was just really respected. He was a straight shooter, a fair guy. He was just highly respected. I think a lot of small communities have that kind of guy, and he was that kind of guy here."

In high school Karl Raffin played for his dad.

As he got older Karl went into coaching himself, and that"s when it really hit him about how good of a coach his father was.

"I"m not sure I understood it at the time," Karl Raffin said of playing for his dad. "Once I got myself into coaching and saw what it was all about, he was a tremendous coach. He put in the time. He was passionate about it. He was always trying to better himself as a coach, always trying to learn. He was a fair coach. He was firm, disciplined and he was knowledgeable and he knew what he was doing and he let his other coaches coach. He was a very good coach."

Earlier this fall Wyalusing honored Raffin by naming the Wyalusing football field after him.

It was a great honor; however, to hear his former players and assistant coaches talk about him, you would quickly realize that no honor could do justice for what Raffin meant to the school.

Longtime Wyalusing assistant coach Dave Behrend was fighting back tears as he talked about coaching with his friend.

Former players talked about how much Raffin changed their entire lives.

Karl Raffin was happy that his father got to be a part of that moment.

"It was really great," Karl said. "I"m really happy the school did that. My mother was Doctor (Karl) Peterson"s personal nurse for 30 years. I am named after Karl Peterson. It"s Peterson Stadium. It"s Ray Raffin field. It all kind of fits together. To get that kind of recognition was really nice and I think my dad really appreciated it. He wasn"t one for accolades, but I think it was special for him."

Even today, Raffin is a coach that everyone in the NTL respects, and they all know what he meant to the league.

"I speak all the time to our district coaches association and I know the things they set up years ago between my father, and coach Moyer and coach Raffin," Athens coach Jack Young said. "They were the foundation of what NTL football kind of became. Coach Raffin was one of those three guys and he was nothing but a class act. Everything he did was a class act. Stories I heard of his relationship with his own players. I know for a fact he"s reached out to check out on players from other teams.

"When I came back and became the head football coach at Athens, he was one of the first people to reach out to me. He"s just a class act, probably the biggest thing I could say about Ray Raffin."

Karl Raffin knows that it was a special time for NTL football when his dad was coaching.

"Canton was a perennial district contender," Karl said. "In that time frame we had undefeated seasons in there and a district championship. Towanda was always tough. The guy from Troy was highly respected, (Mark) Strzelecki was highly respected. It was the Golden era of NTL football."

As the son of one of those three legendary coaches, Jack Young knows how much the three of them meant to the region.

"I just know those three guys, and coach Raffin and my father especially, were so active in the state association," Young said. My father and coach Raffin are both past presidents of the state association. They worked hard to recognize all areas of the state. Worked so hard on doing things, whether it be for a young man"s play on the field or his academics.

"I can"t tell you how many stories I have heard from people that didn"t play football and what he meant to them as a teacher and a mentor. The same type of things I heard about coach Moyer and my father. It brings me back to a lot of old times. The kind of things I think about when football season ends, I as a coach think about how I need to improve. It automatically brings me back to think about guys like my dad and coach Raffin. They were competitive as hell on that Friday night in October or first Friday in November, but other than that they were tremendous friends. Wyalusing was always tough as hell, they were always well coached. He touched so many people that weren"t even football players. When you talk to the people in my generation they were our coaches. Whether I"m in the Canton/Troy area, Wyalusing. The ball is kind of in our court, for us to keep things thriving we have to rely on what they built."

What the NTL is today started with guys like Raffin.

" They were the foundation of what the NTL is all about right now," Young said. "Those are the guys that put NTL football on the map. They did everything in their power to prove the NTL could compete. Everything those guys did was just legendary. What is unique there legendary status as NTL coaches, but if you look at those guys and what they did previously growing up, being athletes in high school, going to the military, no matter what they did. Those guys just did legendary stuff. Losing someone like coach Raffin is really hard. I guess now it really is kind of a time to reflect.

"They took what NTL football was to another level. The way those guys prepared for games. They didn"t have the technology they have today. The way Ray Raffin, Miller Moyer and my father prepared it was tremendous. I learned it from my father, but I also learned it from those guys. You have to outwork the next guys. They all had tremendous, unbelievable, historic runs, where they won three NTL titles, umpteen NTL titles in a row. It doesn"t happen. I may spend my entire coaching career driving for that undefeated season, but those are the guys that set the tone with how hard they work. I know for a fact those three guys are responsible for how we get together as NTL coaches now and discuss how we approach the offseason stuff. They built traditions, they built a camaraderie between our NTL coaches. It"s because of them that we have a great camaraderie, great friendship among our coaches."

Karl Raffin always saw what kind of work ethic his dad put in as coach.

"Honest to God, some of my fondest memories were the coaches being around here all weekend long," Raffin said. "Watching game films, or driving around the area watching games, driving to Canton on Saturday"s. He put in the time. He made sure he was prepared. Him and Jack Young were incredibly close. They went to clinics together. I have a lot of fond memories of Jack and my dad."

Like Young, Karl Raffin always saw how hard the coaches competed on Friday"s, and then how well they got along off the field.

"To put it in perspective, when Jack Young died, my dad was one of his pallbearers," Karl Raffin said. "They were rivals on the field, but they were good friends. My father and Jack Young were ambassadors for high school football. They were involved in things like the Big 33. That was my family vacation when I was a kid, we went to Hershey for the Big 33."

For all he accomplished in his coaching career, Raffin was never one to brag or make a big deal out of it.

When the field was named after him, Raffin put in simple terms what he had accomplished.

"We had a good time with what we did," Raffin said on that day. "It was a career."

It was a career at Wyalusing for Raffin. It was a career that no one will ever forget.

Like Moyer at Canton and Young at Towanda, there will never be anyone who forgets the legacy of Raffin in Wyalusing.

It"s a legacy that helped put Wyalusing on the map.

"It"s similar to a Bill Sexton (at Towanda), you got just about any place and you say you are from Wyalusing and they know my father, or they know the wrestling program," Karl Raffin said. "He did get a lot of recognition for the area, for sure."

Generations from now people will see the words Ray Raffin Field, and they will remember all he accomplished during that career.

And, today, many miss Raffin and what he meant to so many.

"Coach Raffin is going to be missed," Young said. "We are going to have those times to reflect and enjoy all the memories. There are definitely three legendary coaches up there right now and I definitely think they are together right now catching up."

Throughout not just the region, but the state, Raffin represented Wyalusing, and he was a person that represented the town, the school, and the football team the right way.

Karl Raffin has seen how much his dad meant to not only the football team, but all of Wyalusing.

"I think that"s the thing, he"s most known in circles as a football coach," Karl Raffin said. "But, he was ingrained in the community. He was an active member of a lot of civic organizations. He was just really respected. He was a straight shooter, a fair guy. He was just highly respected. I think a lot of small communities have that kind of guy, and he was that kind of guy here."

In high school Karl Raffin played for his dad.

As he got older Karl went into coaching himself, and that"s when it really hit him about how good of a coach his father was.

"I"m not sure I understood it at the time," Karl Raffin said of playing for his dad. "Once I got myself into coaching and saw what it was all about, he was a tremendous coach. He put in the time. He was passionate about it. He was always trying to better himself as a coach, always trying to learn. He was a fair coach. He was firm, disciplined and he was knowledgeable and he knew what he was doing and he let his other coaches coach. He was a very good coach."

Earlier this fall Wyalusing honored Raffin by naming the Wyalusing football field after him.

It was a great honor; however, to hear his former players and assistant coaches talk about him, you would quickly realize that no honor could do justice for what Raffin meant to the school.

Longtime Wyalusing assistant coach Dave Behrend was fighting back tears as he talked about coaching with his friend.

Former players talked about how much Raffin changed their entire lives.

Karl Raffin was happy that his father got to be a part of that moment.

"It was really great," Karl said. "I"m really happy the school did that. My mother was Doctor (Karl) Peterson"s personal nurse for 30 years. I am named after Karl Peterson. It"s Peterson Stadium. It"s Ray Raffin field. It all kind of fits together. To get that kind of recognition was really nice and I think my dad really appreciated it. He wasn"t one for accolades, but I think it was special for him."

Even today, Raffin is a coach that everyone in the NTL respects, and they all know what he meant to the league.

"I speak all the time to our district coaches association and I know the things they set up years ago between my father, and coach Moyer and coach Raffin," Athens coach Jack Young said. "They were the foundation of what NTL football kind of became. Coach Raffin was one of those three guys and he was nothing but a class act. Everything he did was a class act. Stories I heard of his relationship with his own players. I know for a fact he"s reached out to check out on players from other teams.

"When I came back and became the head football coach at Athens, he was one of the first people to reach out to me. He"s just a class act, probably the biggest thing I could say about Ray Raffin."

Karl Raffin knows that it was a special time for NTL football when his dad was coaching.

"Canton was a perennial district contender," Karl said. "In that time frame we had undefeated seasons in there and a district championship. Towanda was always tough. The guy from Troy was highly respected, (Mark) Strzelecki was highly respected. It was the Golden era of NTL football."

As the son of one of those three legendary coaches, Jack Young knows how much the three of them meant to the region.

"I just know those three guys, and coach Raffin and my father especially, were so active in the state association," Young said. My father and coach Raffin are both past presidents of the state association. They worked hard to recognize all areas of the state. Worked so hard on doing things, whether it be for a young man"s play on the field or his academics.

"I can"t tell you how many stories I have heard from people that didn"t play football and what he meant to them as a teacher and a mentor. The same type of things I heard about coach Moyer and my father. It brings me back to a lot of old times. The kind of things I think about when football season ends, I as a coach think about how I need to improve. It automatically brings me back to think about guys like my dad and coach Raffin. They were competitive as hell on that Friday night in October or first Friday in November, but other than that they were tremendous friends. Wyalusing was always tough as hell, they were always well coached. He touched so many people that weren"t even football players. When you talk to the people in my generation they were our coaches. Whether I"m in the Canton/Troy area, Wyalusing. The ball is kind of in our court, for us to keep things thriving we have to rely on what they built."

What the NTL is today started with guys like Raffin.

" They were the foundation of what the NTL is all about right now," Young said. "Those are the guys that put NTL football on the map. They did everything in their power to prove the NTL could compete. Everything those guys did was just legendary. What is unique there legendary status as NTL coaches, but if you look at those guys and what they did previously growing up, being athletes in high school, going to the military, no matter what they did. Those guys just did legendary stuff. Losing someone like coach Raffin is really hard. I guess now it really is kind of a time to reflect.

"They took what NTL football was to another level. The way those guys prepared for games. They didn"t have the technology they have today. The way Ray Raffin, Miller Moyer and my father prepared it was tremendous. I learned it from my father, but I also learned it from those guys. You have to outwork the next guys. They all had tremendous, unbelievable, historic runs, where they won three NTL titles, umpteen NTL titles in a row. It doesn"t happen. I may spend my entire coaching career driving for that undefeated season, but those are the guys that set the tone with how hard they work. I know for a fact those three guys are responsible for how we get together as NTL coaches now and discuss how we approach the offseason stuff. They built traditions, they built a camaraderie between our NTL coaches. It"s because of them that we have a great camaraderie, great friendship among our coaches."

Karl Raffin always saw what kind of work ethic his dad put in as coach.

"Honest to God, some of my fondest memories were the coaches being around here all weekend long," Raffin said. "Watching game films, or driving around the area watching games, driving to Canton on Saturday"s. He put in the time. He made sure he was prepared. Him and Jack Young were incredibly close. They went to clinics together. I have a lot of fond memories of Jack and my dad."

Like Young, Karl Raffin always saw how hard the coaches competed on Friday"s, and then how well they got along off the field.

"To put it in perspective, when Jack Young died, my dad was one of his pallbearers," Karl Raffin said. "They were rivals on the field, but they were good friends. My father and Jack Young were ambassadors for high school football. They were involved in things like the Big 33. That was my family vacation when I was a kid, we went to Hershey for the Big 33."

For all he accomplished in his coaching career, Raffin was never one to brag or make a big deal out of it.

When the field was named after him, Raffin put in simple terms what he had accomplished.

"We had a good time with what we did," Raffin said on that day. "It was a career."

It was a career at Wyalusing for Raffin. It was a career that no one will ever forget.

Like Moyer at Canton and Young at Towanda, there will never be anyone who forgets the legacy of Raffin in Wyalusing.

It"s a legacy that helped put Wyalusing on the map.

"It"s similar to a Bill Sexton (at Towanda), you got just about any place and you say you are from Wyalusing and they know my father, or they know the wrestling program," Karl Raffin said. "He did get a lot of recognition for the area, for sure."

Generations from now people will see the words Ray Raffin Field, and they will remember all he accomplished during that career.

And, today, many miss Raffin and what he meant to so many.

"Coach Raffin is going to be missed," Young said. "We are going to have those times to reflect and enjoy all the memories. There are definitely three legendary coaches up there right now and I definitely think they are together right now catching up." Loss of a legend: Area won't forget the legacy of Ray Raffin - 2016 PHAC and District 4 News - Seals Football

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Loss of a legend: Area won't forget the legacy of Ray Raffin.

 

By: Brian Fees | Towanda Daily Review | December 15, 2016 | Photo courtesy Brian Fees

 

There was a time when legends walked the fields of NTL football stadiums. There was Miller A. Moyer in Canton. There was Jack Young Sr. in Towanda. And, there was Ray Raffin in Wyalusing.

On Wednesday the last of those legendary coaches passed away as Ray Raffin lost his battle with cancer. Raffin was one of the coaches who made NTL football what it is today. Raffin helped put Wyalusing, and the entire NTL, on the map.

During his career Raffin won 205 games for the Rams. Throughout his time with the Rams he won 11 NTL titles and he also brought home a District 4 crown. However, his biggest impact was on those he coached, and those in the community.

Raffin was known to say "Remember who you are . . . What you are . . . and who you represent."

Throughout not just the region, but the state, Raffin represented Wyalusing, and he was a person that represented the town, the school, and the football team the right way.

Karl Raffin has seen how much his dad meant to not only the football team, but all of Wyalusing.

"I think that"s the thing, he"s most known in circles as a football coach," Karl Raffin said. "But, he was ingrained in the community. He was an active member of a lot of civic organizations. He was just really respected. He was a straight shooter, a fair guy. He was just highly respected. I think a lot of small communities have that kind of guy, and he was that kind of guy here."

In high school Karl Raffin played for his dad.

As he got older Karl went into coaching himself, and that"s when it really hit him about how good of a coach his father was.

"I"m not sure I understood it at the time," Karl Raffin said of playing for his dad. "Once I got myself into coaching and saw what it was all about, he was a tremendous coach. He put in the time. He was passionate about it. He was always trying to better himself as a coach, always trying to learn. He was a fair coach. He was firm, disciplined and he was knowledgeable and he knew what he was doing and he let his other coaches coach. He was a very good coach."

Earlier this fall Wyalusing honored Raffin by naming the Wyalusing football field after him.

It was a great honor; however, to hear his former players and assistant coaches talk about him, you would quickly realize that no honor could do justice for what Raffin meant to the school.

Longtime Wyalusing assistant coach Dave Behrend was fighting back tears as he talked about coaching with his friend.

Former players talked about how much Raffin changed their entire lives.

Karl Raffin was happy that his father got to be a part of that moment.

"It was really great," Karl said. "I"m really happy the school did that. My mother was Doctor (Karl) Peterson"s personal nurse for 30 years. I am named after Karl Peterson. It"s Peterson Stadium. It"s Ray Raffin field. It all kind of fits together. To get that kind of recognition was really nice and I think my dad really appreciated it. He wasn"t one for accolades, but I think it was special for him."

Even today, Raffin is a coach that everyone in the NTL respects, and they all know what he meant to the league.

"I speak all the time to our district coaches association and I know the things they set up years ago between my father, and coach Moyer and coach Raffin," Athens coach Jack Young said. "They were the foundation of what NTL football kind of became. Coach Raffin was one of those three guys and he was nothing but a class act. Everything he did was a class act. Stories I heard of his relationship with his own players. I know for a fact he"s reached out to check out on players from other teams.

"When I came back and became the head football coach at Athens, he was one of the first people to reach out to me. He"s just a class act, probably the biggest thing I could say about Ray Raffin."

Karl Raffin knows that it was a special time for NTL football when his dad was coaching.

"Canton was a perennial district contender," Karl said. "In that time frame we had undefeated seasons in there and a district championship. Towanda was always tough. The guy from Troy was highly respected, (Mark) Strzelecki was highly respected. It was the Golden era of NTL football."

As the son of one of those three legendary coaches, Jack Young knows how much the three of them meant to the region.

"I just know those three guys, and coach Raffin and my father especially, were so active in the state association," Young said. My father and coach Raffin are both past presidents of the state association. They worked hard to recognize all areas of the state. Worked so hard on doing things, whether it be for a young man"s play on the field or his academics.

"I can"t tell you how many stories I have heard from people that didn"t play football and what he meant to them as a teacher and a mentor. The same type of things I heard about coach Moyer and my father. It brings me back to a lot of old times. The kind of things I think about when football season ends, I as a coach think about how I need to improve. It automatically brings me back to think about guys like my dad and coach Raffin. They were competitive as hell on that Friday night in October or first Friday in November, but other than that they were tremendous friends. Wyalusing was always tough as hell, they were always well coached. He touched so many people that weren"t even football players. When you talk to the people in my generation they were our coaches. Whether I"m in the Canton/Troy area, Wyalusing. The ball is kind of in our court, for us to keep things thriving we have to rely on what they built."

What the NTL is today started with guys like Raffin.

" They were the foundation of what the NTL is all about right now," Young said. "Those are the guys that put NTL football on the map. They did everything in their power to prove the NTL could compete. Everything those guys did was just legendary. What is unique there legendary status as NTL coaches, but if you look at those guys and what they did previously growing up, being athletes in high school, going to the military, no matter what they did. Those guys just did legendary stuff. Losing someone like coach Raffin is really hard. I guess now it really is kind of a time to reflect.

"They took what NTL football was to another level. The way those guys prepared for games. They didn"t have the technology they have today. The way Ray Raffin, Miller Moyer and my father prepared it was tremendous. I learned it from my father, but I also learned it from those guys. You have to outwork the next guys. They all had tremendous, unbelievable, historic runs, where they won three NTL titles, umpteen NTL titles in a row. It doesn"t happen. I may spend my entire coaching career driving for that undefeated season, but those are the guys that set the tone with how hard they work. I know for a fact those three guys are responsible for how we get together as NTL coaches now and discuss how we approach the offseason stuff. They built traditions, they built a camaraderie between our NTL coaches. It"s because of them that we have a great camaraderie, great friendship among our coaches."

Karl Raffin always saw what kind of work ethic his dad put in as coach.

"Honest to God, some of my fondest memories were the coaches being around here all weekend long," Raffin said. "Watching game films, or driving around the area watching games, driving to Canton on Saturday"s. He put in the time. He made sure he was prepared. Him and Jack Young were incredibly close. They went to clinics together. I have a lot of fond memories of Jack and my dad."

Like Young, Karl Raffin always saw how hard the coaches competed on Friday"s, and then how well they got along off the field.

"To put it in perspective, when Jack Young died, my dad was one of his pallbearers," Karl Raffin said. "They were rivals on the field, but they were good friends. My father and Jack Young were ambassadors for high school football. They were involved in things like the Big 33. That was my family vacation when I was a kid, we went to Hershey for the Big 33."

For all he accomplished in his coaching career, Raffin was never one to brag or make a big deal out of it.

When the field was named after him, Raffin put in simple terms what he had accomplished.

"We had a good time with what we did," Raffin said on that day. "It was a career."

It was a career at Wyalusing for Raffin. It was a career that no one will ever forget.

Like Moyer at Canton and Young at Towanda, there will never be anyone who forgets the legacy of Raffin in Wyalusing.

It"s a legacy that helped put Wyalusing on the map.

"It"s similar to a Bill Sexton (at Towanda), you got just about any place and you say you are from Wyalusing and they know my father, or they know the wrestling program," Karl Raffin said. "He did get a lot of recognition for the area, for sure."

Generations from now people will see the words Ray Raffin Field, and they will remember all he accomplished during that career.

And, today, many miss Raffin and what he meant to so many.

"Coach Raffin is going to be missed," Young said. "We are going to have those times to reflect and enjoy all the memories. There are definitely three legendary coaches up there right now and I definitely think they are together right now catching up."

 

About the Author

Brian Fees Author Bio

Brian Fees

Brian Fees is the sports editor of the Daily & Sunday Review in Towanda, PA.